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Are Singaporeans really happy at work?

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They may have been the second most unhappy employees in the world once upon a time, but looks like things sure have changed for Singaporeans today.

A recent jobsDB survey found that more than half of Singaporeans are, in fact, happy in their workplace.

This was a direct contrast to their counterparts in the region – with 62% of those in Hong Kong and 73% in Indonesia stating they are unhappy at work.

Polling 1, 813 local respondents, the survey highlighted relationships with colleagues and bosses was the biggest factor contributing to workplace happiness in Singapore.

This was followed by a good salary and company benefits & incentives.

On the flip side, respondents’ main source of job dissatisfaction came from the lack of career growth and inadequate learning & development programmes at their respective workplaces.

ALSO READ: 23 signs your employees are unhappy in their job

Many also reported having an unsatisfying working environment and the absence of work-life balance as reasons for their frustration.

“At jobsDB, we believe that being happy at work is a priority especially when most Singaporeans spend at least 40 hours at work each week,” Chook Yuh Yng, country manager of jobsDB Singapore, said

“Knowing that Singaporeans place emphasis on work location, we have recently made search by work location available to candidates on our portal. Sometimes, it’s the little things that mean the most.”

Despite being happy with their work, 64% of local respondents stated planned to  change jobs within 12 months, with most citing low salary and lack of career growth as the biggest drivers for quitting.

Echoing the trend, respondents in Indonesia (59%) and Thailand (49%) also highlighted they were planning to resign their current roles this year.

“This may be due to the progressive perceptions of candidates with regard to changing jobs as at least 85% of respondents in all four countries claimed that changing jobs is a good thing, while those who viewed the move as bad only account for 15% or below,” the survey stated.

 

Image: Shutterstock



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